Cardinal Dolan Blesses the Remains of Immigrants Who Died from Coronavirus

The cardinal prayed over the immigrant’s remains and blessed them with holy water.

Cardinal Dolan blesses the remains of immigrants who died of coronavirus inside St. Patrick's Cathedral in Manhattan on July 11, 2020.
Cardinal Dolan blesses the remains of immigrants who died of coronavirus inside St. Patrick's Cathedral in Manhattan on July 11, 2020. (photo: Joseph Zwilling/Archdiocese of New York)

NEW YORK, N.Y. — Cardinal Timothy Dolan blessed July 11 the remains of over 200 Mexican immigrants who died from coronavirus complications in New York.

The Archbishop of New York led the liturgy on Saturday at Saint Patrick’s Cathedral in New York City. There were the cremated remains of 220 people, which are now being transported to Mexico for burial.

"I send them our love and our sympathy and our prayer. These good people have become a part of our home and family but they never forget you back in Mexico. They love you very much," said Cardinal Dolan, according to ABC 7.

According to the New York Times, the state has more than 430,000 confirmed cases of coronavirus, over half of which occurred in New York City. As of Tuesday, coronavirus complications have caused 32,092 deaths across the state and 22,808 of those deaths occurred in the city.

The cardinal prayed over the immigrant’s remains and blessed them with holy water. Organizers noted that burying the dead is a corporal work of mercy.

The private service only included a small number of attendees as many of the deceased individuals did not have family here in the U.S.

Jorge Islas Lopez, the Consul General of Mexico, helped organize and attended the event. He will escort the ashes back to Mexico, where they will be reunited with the families. 

"Many of them died alone because they didn't have family here. We planned with their families in Mexico and will lay them to rest with the dignity and respect they deserve," Lopez said, according to ABC 7.

"These families suffered because they weren't able to be with their loved ones at the time of death," said Cardinal Dolan. "And now to know that they've had God's blessing here at the cathedral and that they're going to be accompanied to their home in Mexico, with the hope of their eternal home in heaven and that we've sought the intercession of their madre, Our Lady of Guadalupe, it means a lot to me."

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