‘Senseless Violence and Horrifying Evil’ — Prayers for Parkland

Spiritual support continues to be offered in aftermath of Valentine’s Day massacre.

Students and family members holds hands Feb. 18 around a makeshift memorial in front of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, where 17 people were killed Feb. 14 in Parkland, Florida.
Students and family members holds hands Feb. 18 around a makeshift memorial in front of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, where 17 people were killed Feb. 14 in Parkland, Florida. (photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

MIAMI — Archbishop Thomas Wenski of Miami urged Broward County to unity, mutual support and strength after a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland killed at least 17 students and teachers and injured dozens more. Parkland is in the Archdiocese of Miami.

In a statement published on the diocesan website, Archbishop Wenski said he offered his prayers as well as those of the Catholic community for everyone affected by this “senseless tragedy.”

“We pray for the deceased and wounded, for their families and loved ones, for our first responders and our entire South Florida community,” said Archbishop Wenski.

Archbishop Wenski urged Floridians to rise above their “understandable outrage” and “come together as a community to support one another” in the aftermath of the shooting. With the Lord’s help, he said, “we can remain strong and resolute to resist evil in all its manifestations.”

“May God heal the brokenhearted and comfort the sorrowing as we once again face as a nation another act of senseless violence and horrifying evil.”

U.S. bishops’ conference President Cardinal Daniel DiNardo of Galveston-Houston echoed Archbishop Wenski’s sentiment and issued a call Wednesday evening for Christians to “unite our prayers and sacrifices for the healing and consolation of all those who have been affected by violence ... and for a conversation of heart, that our communities and nation will be marked by peace.”

Cardinal DiNardo said the USCCB was “deeply saddened” by Wednesday’s shooting and would be praying for an end to gun violence. “I pray also for unity in seeking to build toward a society with fewer tragedies caused by senseless gun violence,” he said.

A 19-year-old former student of the school, who had been expelled for “disciplinary reasons,” stormed Stoneman Douglas High School Wednesday afternoon and opened fire with a semi-automatic rifle. The alleged shooter has a history of violence and has been treated for mental illness.

Students at the school posted videos and photos of the shooting and its aftermath as it unfolded. The shooter was arrested by police about an hour after the attack and remains in custody.

This is the third-deadliest school shooting in American history.

The Pope offered his prayer and condolences, as well.

Representing the Holy Spirit that descended “like a dove” and hovered over Jesus when he was baptized.

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Representing the Holy Spirit that descended “like a dove” and hovered over Jesus when he was baptized.

Bishop Burbidge: The Pandemic is Our ‘Pentecost Moment’

This “21st century Pentecost moment” brought on by the pandemic, Bishop Michael Burbidge said, has underscored the need for good communication in the Church across all forms of media, in order to invite people into the fullness of the Gospel.