Media Watch

Cardinal Ratzinger Compares Cloning Scientists to Hitler

TORONTO STAR, Aug. 9 — In the wake of announcements that three scientists plan to clone a human being by the end of this year, Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, head of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, called cloning “anti-human,” the Canadian daily reported.

“In a certain sense, Hitler was ahead of his time as far as some modern developments are concerned,” said the cardinal, who lived through Nazi Germany as a teenager. Monsignor Elio Sgreccia, vice president of the Pontifical Academy for Life, called cloning “the worst manifestation of human slavery.”

Doctor Severino Antinori was one of three pro-cloning doctors to address a panel of the National Academy of Sciences in Washington. London's Daily Telegraph reported that Antinori called Pope John Paul II and President George W. Bush “criminals” and asserted that he had a “human right” to research cloning.

Mel Gibson and Sons on Pilgrimage to Vatican City SCOTTISH DAILY RECORD AND SUNDAY MAIL, Aug. 5 — Despite his scruffy appearance, actor Mel Gibson had a serious purpose when he turned up in Vatican City with his twin sons, the Scottish daily reported.

Gibson took Edward and Christian, 17, on a pilgrimage to the Vatican. The Australian actor wore religious symbols from the Carmelite order around his neck when he spoke with reporters.

Over Half of Ukrainians Positive About Pope

SOCIS INSTITUTE, Aug. 2 — Just over half of Ukrainians polled by the Socis Institute said that they felt “positive” about Pope John Paul II's June visit, despite condemnations form the Ukrainian Orthodox Church.

Fifty-one percent judged the visit to be positive, while only 14% thought it had been negative. One third of Ukrainians said the papal visit “will reinforce the international prestige” of Ukraine or “will contribute to an improvement in interdenominational relations.” Six percent thought the visit would cause Orthodox-Catholic relations to deteriorate, and 7% said the visit was part of a “plan of global expansion of Catholicism.”

Representing the Holy Spirit that descended “like a dove” and hovered over Jesus when he was baptized.

Bishop Burbidge: The Pandemic is Our ‘Pentecost Moment’

This “21st century Pentecost moment” brought on by the pandemic, Bishop Michael Burbidge said, has underscored the need for good communication in the Church across all forms of media, in order to invite people into the fullness of the Gospel.

Cistercian Father Thomas Esposito says of discerning one’s college choice, ‘There has to be something that tugs at you and makes you want to investigate it further. And then the personal encounter comes in the form of a visit or a chat with a student or alumnus who communicates with the same enthusiasm or energy about the place. And then that love of a place can be a seed which germinates in your own heart through prayer.’

Choose a College With a Discerning Mind and Heart

Cistercian Father Thomas Esposito, assistant professor of theology at the University of Dallas (UD) and subprior (and former vocations director) of the Cistercian Abbey of Our Lady of Dallas, drew from his experience as both a student and now monastic religious to help those discerning understand the parallels between religious and college discernment.

Representing the Holy Spirit that descended “like a dove” and hovered over Jesus when he was baptized.

Bishop Burbidge: The Pandemic is Our ‘Pentecost Moment’

This “21st century Pentecost moment” brought on by the pandemic, Bishop Michael Burbidge said, has underscored the need for good communication in the Church across all forms of media, in order to invite people into the fullness of the Gospel.