Super Bowl Champion Aims for Empathy in New Documentary on Abortion

Watson, a former NFL tight end who won Super Bowl XXXIX with the New England Patriots, interviews more than 30 experts from a variety of fields and socio-political backgrounds for the documentary.

Catherine Hadro (R) interviewed former NFL player Benjamin Watson (L) during the 48th annual March for Life in Washington D.C., Jan. 29, 2021.
Catherine Hadro (R) interviewed former NFL player Benjamin Watson (L) during the 48th annual March for Life in Washington D.C., Jan. 29, 2021. (photo: EWTN)

WASHINGTON — Super Bowl XXXIX champion Benjamin Watson has released a new documentary that interviews people across the political spectrum in an attempt to generate empathy and understanding in the abortion debate.

Entitled “Divided Hearts of America,” the film was initially released on Sept. 17, but became available on video platforms including Amazon Prime and Google Play at the beginning of this month.

Watson, a former NFL tight end who won Super Bowl XXXIX with the New England Patriots, interviews more than 30 experts from a variety of fields and socio-political backgrounds for the documentary.

He expressed hope that the film would “unveil the truth about abortion, the laws, the history and where our country is headed.”

“I believe in the sanctity of life, be it in the womb or on your deathbed. That’s my conviction. But with the film, I’ll engage those who disagree and hear their reasoning. The No. 1 thing I’m looking for is empathy on both sides,” he added.

Written and directed by Chad Bonham, the documentary showcases a variety of speakers, who share their views on abortion. Among other topics, the audience will hear discussions on the negative effects abortion had on women and African Americans. Watson himself is African American.

“It’s important as African Americans that we understand the history of abortion,” says a woman, in the trailer.

“In New York City, the home of Planned Parenthood, for decades, more black babies have been aborted than born alive. For decades,” another man says.

Among others, the film includes interviews with Alveda King, the niece of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.; former presidential candidate and neurosurgeon Dr. Ben Carson; and pro-life OBGYN and speaker Dr. Monica Ruberu.

“The thing that I notice most [after an abortion] is that emotionally, women are traumatized. They‘re dealing with the anxiety and the depression of that loss and they’re being told by society that they should shout their abortions and they should be proud of that choice, but inside they’re in such turmoil,” said Ruberu, on the film’s Facebook page.

“I think a lot of people are seeing what‘s happening. They are recognizing that life is sacred. You know with all of our knowledge that we’ve accumulated… can we create life? No. That should tell you something right there about how sacred it is,” said Carson.

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