Media Watch

Scots Cardinal Professes Loyalty to Church

The Scotsman, Oct. 11 — When Archbishop Keith O'Brien of St. Andrews and Edinburgh, Scotland, was named to become a cardinal, he gave a number of interviews in which he appeared to question Church teaching. The Scotsman quoted him after the Sept. 28 announcement as saying that he'd like to see “full and open discussion” on every level in the Church on contraception, homosexuality and the discipline of clerical celibacy.

But Cardinal-elect O'Brien said his remarks had been misinterpreted by the press, according to the Associated Press. At a Mass Oct. 7, Cardinal-elect O'Brien took the traditional oath of loyalty to the Church — plus an additional, specific oath affirming Church teaching on celibacy, the immorality of the homosexual act and contraception.

He dismissed as a “smear” his critics' claim that this was evidence that Rome had disciplined him for his outspokenness, according to The Scotsman.

Celebrations Sweep Poland for Pope's Jubilee

Independent Catholic News, Oct. 13 — The media have recently focused on Pope John Paul II's physical problems, but Poles know better, said Cardinal Jozef Glemp of Warsaw.

“Popular media focus their interest on illness and difficulties of speech of the Holy Father, as if they were waiting only to see when he is going to close his eyes,” Cardinal Glemp said during a televised Mass of thanksgiving Oct. 12. “Part of the media looks at life in a superficial way, while we want to reach to the core of this phenomenon which is the pontificate of John Paul II.”

The Mass was the first of thousands of commemorations across Poland marking John Paul's 25th anniversary. Other events included special television and radio shows and magazine editions, rock concerts, charity collections and a national student scholarship in the Pope's name.

Ireland Playing Down Its Catholic Heritage?

The Observer, Oct. 12— The Irish Tourist Board apparently has begun a campaign to improve the country's image after a British columnist attacked St. Patrick's Day and the Catholic Church, wrote Observer travel writer Fionuala Cregan.

The columnist, Julie Burchill of The Guardian, “denounced St. Patrick's Day as ‘a celebration of a religion that condemns contraception, abortion, divorce and the right of women to become a priest,’” according to Cregan. “While she did subsequently add that her criticisms were of the Catholic Church and not the Irish people, for many people her comments conjured up images of an Ireland out of touch with the modern world, where priests roam the streets on bicycles and an entire nation grinds to a halt for Sunday Mass.

“The Irish tourist board wants visitors to dismiss stereotypical images of Ireland and discover the new contemporary side of the country— from spas and designer hotels to cookery schools,” Cregan wrote.

President Donald Trump during his speech at a "Thank You" Tour rally held at the Giant Center in Hershey, Pa.

President Trump: ‘Faith in God’ Helps Unite Nation

In an apparent reference to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic and months of demonstrations and civil unrest across several U.S. cities over racial justice issues, Trump said that faith was an important support for civil and national unity.

President Donald Trump during his speech at a "Thank You" Tour rally held at the Giant Center in Hershey, Pa.

President Trump: ‘Faith in God’ Helps Unite Nation

In an apparent reference to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic and months of demonstrations and civil unrest across several U.S. cities over racial justice issues, Trump said that faith was an important support for civil and national unity.