How You Can Help Ukraine: Here Are 5 Catholic Charities Accepting Donations

Looking for practical ways to help?

An Ukrainian refugee woman and her daughter receive food and sanitary items at the aid point to help refugees fleeing the Russian invasion in the Ukraine in the Westend railway station in Budapest, on March 1.
An Ukrainian refugee woman and her daughter receive food and sanitary items at the aid point to help refugees fleeing the Russian invasion in the Ukraine in the Westend railway station in Budapest, on March 1. (photo: FERENC ISZA / AFP via Getty Images)

As the invasion of Ukraine by Russia continues, many Ukrainian people are in need of assistance as they flee or remain within their country. Catholic charity organizations have taken up the call to provide aid in the form of on-the-ground assistance, supplies and shelter. 

For laypeople seeking ways to support those in need, here are five groups accepting donations for their missions in Ukraine. 

 

Aid to the Church in Need

This organization has already committed $1.5 million to provide emergency help to the Church in Ukraine. 

In a statement, Executive President Thomas Heine-Geldern said, “What we all wanted to avoid has happened: Ukraine is in a state of war. ACN has supported the Church in Ukraine during the past and it will not abandon her at this very critical and difficult time.”

ACN’s website hosts a variety of opportunities for financial and spiritual support of the Ukrainian people. 

 

Caritas Internationalis

The website, in bold white letters, states simply, “Ukraine: Help us to protect and save lives.”

“We cannot ignore the tragic humanitarian implications of this war,” said Caritas Internationalis Secretary-General Aloysius John. “It is the duty of the international community to protect the Ukrainian people and ensure their access to lifesaving assistance.”

Caritas is a Catholic confederation seeking to be the helping hand of the Church, aiming to build a world based on justice and fraternal love, according to its website. With members currently working within Ukraine to provide aid, information on financial contributions can be found here.

 

The Catholic Near East Welfare Association

CNEWA focuses on places affected by poverty, war and displacement. An agency of the Vatican, the organization provides funds to assist families and the disabled, as well as initiatives to strengthen Christian communities. Currently, its website states that it is in collaboration with “partners on the ground,” including Caritas Ukraine, to serve those at risk.

“The story is changing by the hour. But what we cannot change is our deep commitment to help innocent people whose lives are in danger,” the website reads. “Your gift will help our brothers and sisters in Ukraine know they are not alone.”

 

Catholic Relief Services

According to CRS, more than 2.9 million people in Ukraine are in need of assistance. Families, forced to flee their homes, are seeking refuge and safety in neighboring countries.

Also working with Caritas, CRS seeks to provide resources like safe shelter, hot meals, hygiene supplies, transport and counseling.

“When you donate, you provide immediate assistance for your Ukrainian sisters and brothers affected by this crisis,” the website reads.

 

Knights of Columbus

Founded on charity, unity and fraternity in 1882, the Knights of Columbus Supreme Council recently promised to match every dollar donated to their Ukraine Solidarity Fund up to $500,000; and 100% of donations they collect will go to immediately providing essential items, like food, medical supplies, communications and religious supplies, to displaced people in Ukraine. Their goal is $2 million.

“Together,” the website reads, “we can bring Christ's healing love to a wounded world.”

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