Letters 08.16.20

Readers respond to Register articles.

(photo: Register Files)

Love and Hate

Hate or love. The choices are yours to make all throughout your God-bestowed lifetime. Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. wrote the following words, “Hate begets hate; violence begets violence; toughness begets a greater toughness. We must meet the forces of hate with the power of love. ... Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.” How can one recognize true love? “Love is when you had the courage and will to take that risk. It might have cost you your life, every ounce of sinew and every beat of your heart! You took that risk, opened your heart, surrendered your own self and even risked a broken heart. From the very start, God, you and our fellow brothers and sisters were meant to become a union of love; a union of new life and one of many blessings unto all.”

Maybe we might freely choose to step back, quiet down and ask this or a similar thought:

“Dear Lord, I am not certain how or where I am to go in this one unearned lifetime. I give you my whole being, my heart, my mind and my spirit. I cannot know for certain where I will be tomorrow, or how I will journey there. I cannot know who I shall meet. “I cannot know why our paths shall cross. However, my Lord and my God, I know this day and forever that you are my God in whose divine company I forever shall strive to walk humbly, to love goodness and to serve others.”

Or one might ask, “Lord, I ask you, dear Creator, to take my heart, my mind, my spirit and my entire being and create in me the new person, the better person and the more compassionate and just person, you, dear Lord call me to become.”

If peace is to prevail over hatred, then we have to learn to love others, including people we do not like or want to be around.

The dignity of every human being is not based on one’s asset/liability ratio. Rather, your greatest treasure was planted and given unto you months before you were born. Use whatever time, talents and skills you have to help renew and strengthen our communities.

Lastly, strive to be at peace with oneself, family, the strangers and God. In short, live in a right manner in which you honestly can love others.

Love is your greatest power. Use it. The choice is always yours to make.

            Father Michael Briese

            pastor, St. Mary Church

            Newport, Maryland

 

‘Blessed’ News

 Many thanks for the update on Blessed Charles de Foucauld, “The Saintly Hermit of the Sahara” (World, July 5 issue).

 I read about him a long time  ago and was very impressed by his conversion.

However, for many years nothing was said about his canonization.

Having myself left the Church for a few years,  conversion stories are always my favorite reading.

The mention in the article of French theologian Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet was quite a surprise, as  I graduated from high school in Meaux, France, where Bossuet had been bishop for many years.

I am looking forward to more information on the upcoming canonization.

            Mrs. Denise Maxwell

            Salt Lake City, Utah

 

Saintly Inspiration

Thank you so much for all of the inspiring saint articles! That is just what we need to hear at this dark time. John Paul II supposedly said, “Holy people alone can renew humanity.”

Saints change the world!

Praise God for his grace in the lives of saints. That article on Carlo Acutis (Culture of Life, July 19 issue) inspired so many people in my family and my friends! Wow!

Thank you!

Brooke

Tucson, Arizona

Michelangelo, “The Last Judgment,” 1536-1541

Dare We Admit That Not All Will Be Saved?

“To die in mortal sin without repenting and accepting God’s merciful love means remaining separated from him forever by our own free choice. This state of definitive self-exclusion from communion with God and the blessed is called ‘hell.’” (CCC 1033)

Michelangelo, “The Last Judgment,” 1536-1541

Dare We Admit That Not All Will Be Saved?

“To die in mortal sin without repenting and accepting God’s merciful love means remaining separated from him forever by our own free choice. This state of definitive self-exclusion from communion with God and the blessed is called ‘hell.’” (CCC 1033)