Arrest Made in Texas Church Theft, Though Tabernacle Remains Missing

A suspect has been charged with burglary in connection with the theft of a tabernacle from a parish church in greater Houston, the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston announced Friday.

The tabernacle belonging to St. Bartholomew the Apostle Catholic Church in Katy, Texas, was stolen on May 8.
The tabernacle belonging to St. Bartholomew the Apostle Catholic Church in Katy, Texas, was stolen on May 8. (photo: Screenshot from YouTube video / Screenshot from YouTube video)

A suspect has been charged with burglary in connection with the theft of a tabernacle from a parish church in greater Houston, the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston announced Friday.

The tabernacle had been stolen from St. Bartholomew the Apostle Catholic Church in Katy, Texas, May 8.

“Thanks to the Katy Police Department‘s diligent efforts and skill, a suspect has been apprehended and charged with burglary. It is our understanding the theft was not motivated by last week’s release of the draft Supreme Court opinion involving Roe v. Wade,” the Galveston-Houston Archdiocese announced May 13.

“Sadly, the tabernacle has not yet been recovered, though efforts by the Katy police are ongoing. In any case, such a theft beyond material price is immeasurably hurtful to us and, speaking theologically, is sacrilegious.”

The suspect was identified by the Houston Chronicle as Christian James Meritt.

The archdiocese stated: “We offer our profound gratitude to the Katy Police for their hard work in the investigation.”

It added: “We ask all to continue praying with us for the parish and all those involved in this matter.” 

Ivan Aivazovsky, “Walking on Water,” ca. 1890

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