Eternal Motivation: The Church Offers Sharp Focus on Salvation

A NOTE FROM OUR PUBLISHER

(photo: Unsplash)
As preparations for the holidays of Thanksgiving and Christmas begin to draw our attention, the Catholic Church in her wisdom offers a sharp focus on preparing for something greater: eternity.

Today amid the scandal, false witness and rash judgment too often on display within the Church and political life, and amid the general confusion in our world about the Truth, the Church reminds us of the need to detach from this transitory life and remember the Four Last Things — death, judgment, heaven and hell. Now is the time to take account of how we live and to reconcile our hearts and minds to Christ in recognition of our mortality. It’s also a time to account for those who are entrusted to our care — to pray for our loved ones who are far from the Church and to pray for the souls of the faithful who have gone before us in death.

St. Cyprian of Carthage, a third-century Church Father, once called his flock to attention with these words, “Here, life is either lost or kept. Here, by the worship of God and by the fruit of faith, provision is made for eternal salvation. Let no one be kept back either by his sins or by his years from coming to obtain salvation. To him who still remains in this world there is no repentance that is too late.”

Till that last day, may all of us, through Mass, confession and prayer or in spiritual and corporal works of mercy, know that the clear promise of Christ and his Church shines through all of the distraction and confusion. Let’s let this awareness of eternity motivate our present actions and thoughts and redirect them more and more to Christ.

God bless you!

Glenn Youngkin his strategist Jeff Roe watch election results come in for the Virginia gubernatorial race at the Westfields Marriott Washington Dulles on Nov. 2 in Chantilly, Virginia.

Education and the Four Last Things (Nov. 13)

Education emerged as a key factor in Virginia’s gubernatorial election, where concerned parents pushed back against curriculum content and school policies on COVID-19. Some say these parents are part of a broader movement for change in the educational landscape. Are we witnessing a reawakening among parents to their rights and responsibilities for the education of their children? This issue we’ll find out. Patrick Reilly, founder and president of the Cardinal Newman Society, is no stranger to the role parents should play in education or in keeping school curricula on target. He joins us today on Register Radio. Then in this month of November we pray for the dead and we also reflect on where we are headed when our souls depart. Will we become saints or lost souls? The Church invites us to make Heaven, Hell, death and judgment a part of our November reflections. We talk to Register columnist John Grondelski about the Four Last Things.