How Christ Makes Himself Present to the City and to the World

“And behold, I am with you always, until the end of the age.” (Matthew 28:20)

Holding the Blessed Sacrament in a monstrance, Pope Francis stands before an empty St. Peter’s Square — and a large TV, radio and internet audience worldwide — as he blesses “the City (of Rome) and the World” (Urbi et Orbi) Friday.
Holding the Blessed Sacrament in a monstrance, Pope Francis stands before an empty St. Peter’s Square — and a large TV, radio and internet audience worldwide — as he blesses “the City (of Rome) and the World” (Urbi et Orbi) Friday. (photo: Vatican Media)
Communal prayer has taken a completely different form in the face of the reality of the novel coronavirus. We no longer can go to Mass. Many of us can’t even go into a church.  But still we pray. 
 
As I’ve participated in prayer through virtual reality — especially today, when I took part in the Pope’s profound Urbi et Orbi blessing from afar — many questions have come to my mind about the efficacy of what I’m doing, and of how I’m praying in this new reality.
 
Joining me to help answer my questions is my favorite liturgy expert, Christopher Carstens. Chris is Director of the Office for Sacred Worship in the Diocese of La Crosse, Wisconsin. He’s also editor of the Adoremus Bulletin and author of A Devotional Journey into the Mass and A Devotional Journey into the Easter Mystery.  
 
To listen to the interview, click here.
Holcomb said that Gianforte and the state legislature “have acted to preserve a level playing field for all female athletes in the state, whether in high school or college.”

New Montana Law Aimed at Protecting Women’s Sports

In a statement, Christiana Holcomb, legal counsel for the group Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF), said, “Allowing males to compete in girls’ sports destroys fair competition and women’s athletic opportunities.”