Broken Hearts are Precious to God

Christ spent his earthly life seeking out, not the perfect and the strong, but the crushed and the weak.

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Photo provided (photo: Register Files)

I never remember hearing “I love you” from my earthly father. It is hard sometimes to hear “I love you” from my heavenly Father. Hearts with a “father hole” hold back from offering that wound to God all year. During this Holiest of Weeks, it is easier to cry out, “Please, I want to be made whole.” “Jesus, Son of David have pity on me.” Christ passes so close in the quiet moments that I can hear the rustle of his hem. I see the tenderness in his eyes. I feel the touch of his warm hand in mine, as he says,  “I say to you, little girl, get up. Arise!”

I remember now that broken things are dear to God.

Christ spent his earthly life seeking out, not the perfect and the strong, but the crushed and the weak. I remember that, even in my brokenness, I am dear to God.

Spend any amount of time visiting with a group of retreatants, and when the “father wound” comes to surface, so do the tears of many grown men and women. Aching. Broken. Raw.

We all know someone who has “thrown” their life away, yet at the root of every broken person is a broken heart. A heart that is asking for the Father’s love. A heart that needs a Father’s love.

Step one is releasing your earthly father from the impossible demand that he fill that infinite God shaped hole in your heart. That hole is the resting place for eternity. The house of God.

Forgiveness is hard. Why didn’t God give me an amazing father? Perhaps there were generations of broken fathers? Who can give what they do not have? Let God heal your generation! Give Him your brokenness.

This is the week to go to Him, to run to Him, and to give Him your broken heart. Broken things, especially broken hearts, are dear to God.

This is the week you will hear, I am a good, good Father. That’s who I AM.” Broken hearts are precious to God. 

The Earth is Not Our Mother

“The main point of Christianity was this: that Nature is not our mother: Nature is our sister. We can be proud of her beauty, since we have the same father; but she has no authority over us; we have to admire, but not to imitate.”—G.K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy

The Earth is Not Our Mother

“The main point of Christianity was this: that Nature is not our mother: Nature is our sister. We can be proud of her beauty, since we have the same father; but she has no authority over us; we have to admire, but not to imitate.”—G.K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy