Mass Changes in Brief

What else does the new General Instruction of the Roman Missal call for during Mass? Here are a few of the major points:

Standing. Stand, then say “May the Lord accept the sacrifice we offer you …” Says the general instruction: “The faithful should stand … from the invitation, Orate, fratres (Pray, brethren), before the prayer over the offerings.”

Kneeling. The congregation “should kneel beginning after the singing or recitation of the Sanctus until after the Amen of the Eucharistic prayer, except when prevented on occasion by reasons of health, lack of space, the large number of people present or some other good reason. Those who do not kneel ought to make a profound bow while the priest genuflects after the consecration. The faithful kneel at the Agnus Dei unless the diocesan bishop determines otherwise.”

Bowing. “An inclination of the head should be made when the three Divine Persons are named, at the name of Jesus, of the Blessed Virgin Mary and of the saint in whose honor Mass is celebrated.”

Silence during Mass. “Sacred silence … as part of the celebration, is to be observed at the designated times … Within the Act of Penitence and again after the invitation to pray, all recollect themselves; but at the conclusion of a reading or the homily, all meditate briefly on what they have heard; then after Communion, they praise and pray to God in their hearts.

Silence before Mass. “Even before the celebration itself, it is commendable for silence to be observed in church, in the sacristy, in the vesting room and in adjacent areas, so that all may dispose themselves to carry out the sacred action in a devout and fitting manner.”

Source: U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops Committee on the Liturgy

Representing the Holy Spirit that descended “like a dove” and hovered over Jesus when he was baptized.

Bishop Burbidge: The Pandemic is Our ‘Pentecost Moment’

This “21st century Pentecost moment” brought on by the pandemic, Bishop Michael Burbidge said, has underscored the need for good communication in the Church across all forms of media, in order to invite people into the fullness of the Gospel.

Cistercian Father Thomas Esposito says of discerning one’s college choice, ‘There has to be something that tugs at you and makes you want to investigate it further. And then the personal encounter comes in the form of a visit or a chat with a student or alumnus who communicates with the same enthusiasm or energy about the place. And then that love of a place can be a seed which germinates in your own heart through prayer.’

Choose a College With a Discerning Mind and Heart

Cistercian Father Thomas Esposito, assistant professor of theology at the University of Dallas (UD) and subprior (and former vocations director) of the Cistercian Abbey of Our Lady of Dallas, drew from his experience as both a student and now monastic religious to help those discerning understand the parallels between religious and college discernment.

Representing the Holy Spirit that descended “like a dove” and hovered over Jesus when he was baptized.

Bishop Burbidge: The Pandemic is Our ‘Pentecost Moment’

This “21st century Pentecost moment” brought on by the pandemic, Bishop Michael Burbidge said, has underscored the need for good communication in the Church across all forms of media, in order to invite people into the fullness of the Gospel.