Some time ago, I came across an anguished post by a devoted mom. She had spent an entire week teaching her kids an in-depth, hands-on, cross-curricular lesson on the major watercolorists of western art. Her kids were enthralled, and seemed to really internalize not only the beauty of the work, but also some of the history, the technical side, and even the biographies of the artists they studied.

Next week? They said, "Watercolor? What's watercolor?"

Poor mom. Kids are crumbs, and that's just a fact. But the thing that struck me is that the woman berated herself over having wasted so much time with the lesson.

How wrong she was! There is no such thing as wasted time with your children. There is such a thing as time spent badly -- time you spend belittling them, for instance. But there is no such thing as loving, attentive time that is wasted. This is true even if the kids have no conscious memory of the event, even if it's only five minutes later (see: Kids are crumbs).

As I've said before, kids are "not empty mason jars waiting to be filled up with the perfect combination of ingredients. We're making people, here, not soup."

There are two related mistakes we can make when we're raising children. One is that we can imagine that it's all within our control, and that if we simply add in all the right elements, we're guaranteed to end up with a happy, confident, faithful, moral, self-sufficient, grounded, hard-working, honest human being. (It doesn't help that a lot of self-styled experts make a tidy living by all but promising success if you just follow their guidelines.)  The truth is, we can do ev-ry-thing-right and guess what? Kid still has free will. Kid still has specific brain chemistry. Kid still runs into a unique set of experiences, and kid processes them in a unique way according to ten thousand unpredictable variables.

So the first thing to remember is that, when we make parenting choices, we're not putting in a customized order. It's a much more delicate and artful and hazardous and beautiful process than that, because it is an act of love, and love can't be reduced to supply and demand.

The second mistake is to imagine that, if we don't see the immediate, expected results, it was a wasted effort. This is the folly the mom above fell prey to. She thought, when she was teaching her kids about Winslow Homer, that she was just teaching them about Winslow Homer. I love me some Winslow Homer, but I know that it's much more important for the kids to learn about other things -- things like, "Beauty is important and worth spending time on." "Your mother loves you and thinks you are worth spending time on."

Please note that these are things that you can teach by following an intensive Montessori-based course on the history of watercolor, or you can teach it by hanging around on a trampoline telling stupid jokes, or you can teach it by driving the kid to all his hideously tedious T-ball games all weekend long, or you can teach it by . . . well, you get the idea. Time and attention. These are the two things that kids need, and there are a million different ways you can provide them. This is also because time and attention are acts of love, and you cannot count all the ways that love can be expressed.

The child may be the kind of person who accepts and recognizes your love and attention immediately, saying things like, "I had a nice day with you, Mama." Or he may be the other kind of kid, who doesn't seem to care at all.  He may not think twice about these things until he has children of his own. He may be the kind of kid who thinks you're a terrible parent, until one day, at age 50, he had a sudden recollection of a thing you did, and realizes, "She loved me so much!"

There is so much mystery in the human psyche and how it develops. We can work ourselves into a panic fretting that we havent given properly, and that our children aren't receiving properly; and half the time, we'll be right. Truly, the only way we can be at peace is if, along with doing our best, we remember to turn our children's lives over to God, over and over again. God's generosity works both ways: He is generous in what He gives us, and He is generous in how He receives, as well. When we turn our children over to God, He will not let our efforts go to waste. This is because God is love, and when we show love to the people in our care, God will not let that love go to waste.