Just before the start of the synod a group well organized, well funded progressives gathered in Rome for a conference. The Catholic Herald UK reports here that “people from 31 countries gathered in Italy’s capital from October 1-4 for an assembly to launch the Global Network of Rainbow Catholics.” 

Meanwhile, in a move designed to gather media attention and sympathy a Polish priest, Monsignor Krysztof Olaf Charamsa, held a news conference Saturday in Rome, calling on Pope Francis to revise Catholic doctrine on homosexuality. He admitted that he timed the announcement  in order to put pressure on the Synod of Bishops.

I suspect Monsignor Charamsa was prompted by other behind the scenes advocates of the LGBT agenda, and that his resignation and the high profiled conference were engineered to lobby the synod members. 

What progressives can’t seem to get into their head is that the Catholic Church is not simply another political agency like the United Nations, the European Union or some Congress or Parliament. The Pope, Bishops and priests of the Catholic Church are not for sale. The doctrines and dogmas, of the Catholic Church are not changed because they cannot be changed. The devotions and disciplines of the church (which can be changed) are not altered by public polls, petitions, pressure from the press, well funded lobbying groups, slick PR firms or social media campaigns.

In my experience, when Catholics are pressured by progressives they are very skilled at politely putting their head down, smiling and setting their jaw. Catholic leaders are adept at digging in their heels, deferring decisions, using the “Roman delay”, and resisting change by the sheer inertia of continued discussion, dialogue and doing nothing. I don’t know how to say, “If it ain’t broke don’t fix it.” in Latin, but it ought to be one of the venerable mottos of the Roman Church.

If liberal lobbyists wanted to lose they could have done nothing better than what they have done. If the synod fathers feel they are being pressured by sources outside the synod and outside the Catholic Church itself, there is nothing more likely to unite them and empower them to stand together against the outside onslaught.

This is why external, non Catholic anti-family lobbyists will have wasted their  money setting up conferences, publicity stunts and public relations offices in Rome this month. As Pope Leo resisted the invasion of Attila the Hun with polite but firm diplomacy, the synod fathers will also swat away this latest attack on the Catholic faith.