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Will Noah Sink Religious Movies?

03/20/2014 Comments (23)

By now I am sure you have heard the buzz about the upcoming Biblical cinema epic "Noah".  The film, which gets released March 28, 2014, has been the subject of rumor and controversy since a synopsis of an early script was leaked on line.

I have fears about "Noah" but not the same fears about the amount of license that director Darren Aronofsky takes with the Bible story. I have my opinions about what I have heard, but I will until I see the movie. My fears are more about the movie industry.

Let me bottom line it for you.  If "Noah" under performs at the box office, the headlines practically write themselves.

Christians Sink Noah.  Christians Stay Home, Noah Under Water. And so on.

If this movie fails, especially with all the lip service paid to Christians in the lead up to its release, you can kiss the idea of big budget budget biblical film adaptations by big-time competent directors and good writers, good bye.

I suspect the industry still looks at "Passion of the Christ" as a money making aberration and Hollywood has been loathe to try anything like it.  So along comes "Noah". Even if the failure of the movie is completely the fault of cruddy writing and monumentally stupid directorial decisions, Hollywood will not blame them.  They will blame Christians as finicky puritans who only want Kirk Cameron movies and things like the "Son of God."

Nothing against those movies, but I want more.  I want big budget bible made with compelling writing, compelling acting, and compelling directing that can uplift more than just the small niche audiences that watch things like "Fireproof," movies that simply preach to the choir.

So even if the rumors are true and Noah stinks, I hope it stinks its way to big box office so that the next guy has a chance to get it right.

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About Pat Archbold

Pat Archbold
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Patrick Archbold is co-founder of Creative Minority Report, a Catholic website that puts a refreshing spin on the intersection of religion, culture, and politics. When not writing, Patrick is director of information technology at a large international logistics company. Patrick, his wife Terri, and their five children reside in Long Island, N.Y.