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U.S. Supreme Court Ruling a Win for Sidewalk Counselors

Thursday, June 26, 2014 11:56 AM Comments (18)

In a stunning unanimous decision in favor of pro-lifers, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Massachusetts' 35-foot "buffer zones" around abortion clinics to keep pro-lifers away from women considering abortion, are unconstitutional.

"Petitioners wish to converse with their fellow citizens about an important subject on the public streets and sidewalks -- sites that have hosted discussions about the issues of the day throughout history," Roberts reportedly wrote in the decision. He added that the Masachusetts law attempted to shut down a "traditional public forum to all speakers" namely the sidewalk.

About a decade ago, the court had upheld an eight foot buffer zone but Massachusetts attempted to enlarge buffer zones to a whopping 35 feet. Reportedly. even Justice Elena Kagan even commented that "that's a lot of space." Do you know how extremely radical on abortion you have to be to be to more extreme and radical than Justice Kagan?

Justice Samuel Alito wrote that "Speech in favor of the clinic and its work by employees and agents is permitted; speech criticizing the clinic and its work is a crime. This is blatant viewpoint discrimination."

If the court had upheld this buffer zone, it would have been a disaster for the future of sidewalk counselors speaking to women entering abortion clinics. This law is of a piece with efforts by pro-abortion forces to ensure women don't hear the truth about abortion. They've attempted to shut down crisis pregnancy centers where women are given free ultrasounds, they've attempted to to widen the parameters of racketeering statues to include pro-lifers, they've demonized pro-lifers in the media as well. Today is a big win. It's a big win for sidewalk counselors, it's a big win for women, and a big day for the unborn.

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About Matthew Archbold

Matthew Archbold
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Matt Archbold graduated from Saint Joseph's University in 1995. He is a former journalist who left the newspaper business to raise his five children. He writes for the Creative Minority Report.