The Pictures The Gov't Doesn't Want You To See

Federal health officials (a title which always makes me shiver) have unveiled a series of nine graphic warning labels that will now adorn the top half of cigarette packs

“These labels are frank, honest and powerful depictions of the health risks of smoking,  and they will help encourage smokers to quit, and prevent children from smoking,” Kathleen Sebelius, the secretary of health and human services, said Tuesday in a statement.

The federal government is all about truth, you see.  They insist that the public know the truth about the potential health issues that are caused by certain behaviors.  Smokers certainly do not wish to see these graphic and horrifying images every time they want to do something as simple as have smoke.  But too bad.  The truth is the truth.  Horrifying or not, graphic or not,  people must see, must be forced to see the truth of their actions.  Right?

This is why the federal government insists that every mother see the real world consequences of abortion before engaging in a behavior (procedure) with significant health risks.

Oh yeah.  That is right. They only insist on showing the truth when that truth is convenient.

Would that abortion had frank, honest, and powerful depictions of the health risks to the mother and the death risks to the child.

On second thought, doesn’t abortion prevent those children from ever smoking?  Maybe this makes sense after all?

Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone of San Francisco celebrates the ‘Mass of the Americas’ using the extraordinary form of the Mass at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, D.C., Nov. 16, 2019.

Msgr. Charles Pope and Limiting the Latin Mass (July 24)

Historically, changes to worship have always cause intense reaction. Reaction to Pope Francis’ decree Traditionis Custodes limiting the use of the Traditional Latin Mass is no different. Msgr. Charles Pope helps us sift through the concern and frustrations many Catholics have we expressed. Then, in an Editor’s Corner, Matthew Bunson, executive editor for EWTN News, and Jeanette De Melo discuss the Napa Institute conference and a roundup of Catholic news.

Photo portrait of American poet and Catholic convert Wallace Stevens (1879–1955).

The Art of Catholic America (July 17)

Art, music, literature — in a word, beauty — have in the life and history of Catholicism been a great evangelizing force. For a lesson in this we often turn to the lasting masterpieces and legacy of Christendom in Europe. But what about on our own shores: Is there an imprint on the U.S. from American painters, poets and the like who were Catholic? On Register Radio, we explore American artists and Catholicism in the U.S. with Robert Royal, founder and editor in chief of The Catholic Thing. Then we look at the ways the sexual revolution has impacted the professions — particularly education, psychology and medicine — with Jennifer Roback Morse of the Ruth Institute.