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Doctor Kills the 'Wrong Baby'

Father of Daughter with Down Syndrome Speaks Out Against 'Deformed' Culture

BY Danielle Bean

| Posted 4/20/10 at 9:00 AM

 

Kurt Kondrich is a loving father speaking out in defense of his daughter’s life—in a way no father should ever have to.

When the father of 6-year-old Chloe (who has Down syndrome) read a recent news story about a “doctor”’ whose medical license was revoked for aborting the “wrong twin” of one of his patients, he was incensed.

The “right twin”’ to kill, you see, would have been the one with Down syndrome. This was more than sweet Chloe’s dad could stomach:

“The doctor was ‘targeting a fetus with Down syndrome’, and he admitted he ‘screwed up’.  Based on the facts presented in this article one can conclude that if the doctor had properly targeted the unborn child with Down syndrome and successfully terminated this twin then he would have kept his medical license,” Kondrich wrote at LifeSiteNews after reading the story.

“Currently 90%+ of children diagnosed prenatally with Down syndrome are ‘excluded’ from ever shining their bright light in a lost world that has become obsessed with perfection and unrealistic traits.  If the proper practice of medicine in our culture includes the skill of identifying and eliminating a prenatal twin who fails to meet the criteria of “normal”, then we truly do need a massive overhaul of the ‘health care’ system, and it is the soul of our nation that is ‘deformed’.”

As a mother of a child with a genetic illness myself, I know the pain of having a child who is viewed as prenatally “disposable” by the majority of the medical profession. I join Mr. Kondrich in his outrage at a society that dares to say that his daughter should not exist.

I’m glad that people like Mr. Kondrich are not remaining silent in the face of this kind of injustice.

It’s a scandal to realize that we live in a culture where doctors are disciplined only when they accidentally kill the “wrong baby.” As long as they keep killing the genetically imperfect ones, we are content to call what they do “medicine” or “progress.”

What price are we willing to pay, both personally and as a nation, in order to eliminate “imperfect” children?

I pray that more parents like Mr. Kondrich will be inspired to speak out against injustice against their disabled children. These “disabilities” many people are in a hurry to rid the world of have faces. I can’t help but think that if we continue to show the world a more and more of those shining, smiling faces, if we continue to demand that society see our children first and their disabilities second—we can change some parents’ and doctors’ hearts before it’s too late.